Overbranding-how-much-is-too-much

Over Branding: How Much Is Too Much?

The Kardashian-Jenner family is not known for their subtlety, but Kylie Jenner’s recent Instagram vacation managed to take over branding to a whole new level. Meant to promote her new line of skin care products called Kylie Skin, Jenner’s trip was a marketing campaign not exactly in disguise. The 21-year-old billionaire was recently criticized for a walnut facial scrub in the product line, which experts claim creates micro cuts in the skin. Even so, she successfully used the “luxury travel influencer” approach to advertise the product launch.

Pink Paradise

Jenner, who already has a massive Instagram following of 142 million, traveled with a group of friends to Turks and Caicos in a private jet emblazoned with the Kylie Skin logo. If you think that’s extra, it doesn’t end there. The logo was also on the eye masks, satin pillows, sweaters, water bottles, and make up sets in the plane. On the island, it was on everything from the floor mats and coconuts, to the cotton onesies (maybe even on the toilet paper?).

All of this begs the question: when it comes to branding, how much is too much?

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When More is Too Much

There’s a very, very thin line between generating buzz and shoving your product in people’s faces. Star Wars, for example, partnered with a mascara line to promote one of its films. Now owned by Disney, Star Wars has already established its reputation and has its claim to fame. People will go watch the film no matter what, and so the extra marketing tactic is too much.

You don’t have to slap a logo on everything in order to establish your brand’s identity. Good branding is about generating the right amount of curiosity.

Find Your Audience and Stick to it 

Over branding comes off as inauthentic, like the popular kid in school who won’t stop talking about himself. It’s better to identify your target audience and focus on ways to market specifically to them, not throw your brand into partnerships that don’t make sense. Remember: it’s not about you, it’s about your customers.

Good Branding

When Less is More

When it comes to marketing and design, there’s a tricky middle ground to aim for. Kylie Jenner’s logo vomit is not something brands should try to replicate for themselves. For most businesses, this strategy will desensitize customers and turn them away.

A powerful brand is more than just a logo design or a catchy slogan. That’s why most of the world’s biggest brands have minimalist logos (ex: Apple, Nike, Google). These brands are memorable, consistent, humanized, purposeful, and create a complete experience. That is to say, starting from the first impression, everything surrounding the product or service is connected to the brand. This full experience, unique to the brand itself, is what keeps customers coming back.

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Why Over Branding Works for Kylie Skin

There aren’t many brands that can pull off a stunt like this, but Jenner can. Why? Because everyone already expects her and her family to be over-the-top and unapologetic. And as is the case with their terrible reality show, people still can’t help but watch.

The obnoxious type of branding that Jenner did for her skin care line might work because everything she does in Turks and Caicos reflects the desires of the people who follow her. Also, this branding occurred mainly on Instagram, which is the perfect place for this type of flagrant marketing. Similar to Nike’s Colin Kaepernick ad, this campaign is going by the rule of “no publicity is bad publicity.” If you’re being talked about, you’re doing it right.

energyhill’s Branding Services

There are many different elements to branding, and it’s very easy to overdo it. At energyhill, we give your brand the voice it needs to connect with your audience. Contact us to tweak your marketing strategy and reach your business goals.